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Chestnut


[R] Castanea sativa Miller (Fagaceae).
Fr: Châtaignier; Ge: Kastanienbaum; Pt: Castanheiro; Sp: Castano; It: Castagno.
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- Large tree cultivated in Mediterranean regions, slim in stature with a taproot, attaining 35 to 45 m in height in the wild, but not more than 15 to 18 m when cultivated.
- Principal European producers are Italy, Spain, Portugal, France and Greece.
- The fruit (chestnut) is a spiny husk containing 2 or 3 chestnuts (*) , that are consumed fresh, boiled, grilled or preserved in sugar (iced chestnuts). They have long provided a nutritional base for both man and animals. The tannin and the very hard wood are also used.
- It is cultivated in groves for fruit and in coppices for wood.
- It is propagated by grafting .
- It starts to produce fruit in its 6th year; and may live 100 years.
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-Diseases: the most important problems are the chestnut ink disease (Phytophthora cambivora, P. cinnamomi, P. cactorum) and chestnut blight (Endothia parasitica) which may destroy a chestnut grove.
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- Principal European pests: the European shot-hole borer (Xyleborus dispar) attacks the wood, the acorn moth (Cydia splendana) and the chestnut weevil (Curculio elephas) may harm the fruit.

[R] Images

* Chestnut-tree (Minost C.)
a: leaf; b: catkin (male flowers); c: female flower; d; husk bearing long prickles (open).


To read this page in French

HYPPZ on line: Species (scientific names), Pests (common names), Glossary, Crops.

HYP3 : HYPP Phytopathology.

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